Department of Chemistry

THE PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES OF THE DEPARTMENT

Introduction
The Department of Chemistry, Adamawa State University came into existence in October 2002, when the university was established.  The department offers courses leading to the award of
BSc Chemistry.  The department plans to run a degree program in industrial chemistry.  As a service department, it equally offers course units in all areas of chemistry which are taught to students in other disciplines such as education, physics, biology, biochemistry, engineering, microbiology, agriculture and environmental sciences.  The department provides a wide range of teaching, research and support facilities appropriate for undergraduate and future postgraduate programs.  The program is being designed to feature diverse opportunities for students and even in the area of Industrial Chemistry.
Mission
The Department of Chemistry supports the missions of ADSU through its commitment to integrate and disseminate basic and applied chemical knowledge.  We therefore prepare and graduate students in Chemistry for professional participation in chimerical industries, result oriented jobs, and provide viable collaboration with other related disciplines for application in the improvement of the quality of life in an ever changing world.
Vision
Our vision is to prepare broadly educated, technologically efficient and productive chemist for our region, state, nation and internationally through scholarly work, effective training, innovative research and public service activities.  This vision is predicated on giving high quality chemical knowledge with more emphasis on teaching and research to develop practical skills, expose students to various areas of chemistry and their application in all aspects of chemical sciences, industry and technology.
Philosophy
The programme in chemistry is designed to provide high standard achievement and train students towards acquisition of skills and abilities in chemistry for self-employment. Job creation or fit into the labour market at the end of three or four year program.

Objectivities
In order to achieve its mission, the department outlines the following objectives:

  • Promote understanding of basic concepts in chemistry through acquisition of sound theoretical and practical skills.
  • Provide high quality chemical education for academic and professional courses such as medicine, engineering, technology, industries, food, environment, agriculture etc.
  • Develop interest in students to study chemistry as a discipline and provide a broad, innovative and quality education in all aspects of chemistry used in daily life.
  • Enable students acquire a broad awareness of application, and exposed them to different chemical processes used in industries and their technological applications in solving societal problems.
  • Prepare students for either advanced studies in chemistry or related programs, or careers in industry.
  • Develop problem solving skills so as to inculcate creative thinking and research.

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • The Department of Chemistry will graduate professional competent chemists who are expected to demonstrate the following measureable outcomes:
  • Possess a solid foundation and proficiency in chemistry and basic sciences (including mathematics, physics and computer skills) that enable them to learn new concepts and techniques.
  • Possess proficiency in chemistry covering all chemical concepts and knowledge of the structure of chemical materials.
  • Analyze data, critically assess their validity, and interpret and discuss results to solve complex chemical problems.
  • Posses skills of discovery, both observational and experimental, to critically evaluate analyze existing and new chemical compounds, through economically viable processing and synthetic techniques.
  • Communicate effectively to diverse audiences both orally and in writing.
  • Utilize information technologies (internet, library, databases) to promote self-learning.
  • Work independently and collaboratively to achieve and objective(s).

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND COURSE DURATION

  • Candidates seeking admission into the Department should posses five credits which must include Chemistry, Physics, Biology, English and Mathematics at Senior Secondary School Certificate (SSCE) or its equivalent.
  • An acceptable level of performance in Universities Matriculation Examination  is require in addition to (i) above for admission into the First year.
  • Candidates seeking direct entry admission to the second year should in addition to (i) above possess a credit in at least two subjects (one of which must be Chemistry), and either mathematics or physics or biology in advanced GCE or IJMB or its equivalent) or National Diploma or National Education Certificates at Upper Credit level from a recognized Institution.
  • The course duration is a minimum of 4 years, Candidates with requirements stated in (ii) above are normally admitted into a 3 – year program.

DEFERMENT OF ADMISSION

The Department does not accept the deferment of any admission in the first semester.  A student can however defer his/her admission in the second semester after following the due process.
Grading system and award of degrees

  • Level Performance:  The achievement of a student that is properly registered for a course in the Department is graded normally graded as follows:  A: 70-100%; B: 60-69%; C: 50-59%; D: 45-49%; E: 40-44%; F: 0-39%.  The numerical values of the grades are – A = 5, B = 4, C = 3, D = 2; E = 1, F = 0
  • Grade Point Average (GPA):  The grades earned by a student at the end of each semester examinations are averaged.  This takes into account the core courses and selected elective course registered for that semester and the credit units arising from them.  The total grade point earned is divided by the total credit units registered for that semester to give the GPA.
  • Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA):

The annual performance of a student is essential on the basis of his/her CGPA.  This  is the cumulative average for the total grade points earned in the two semesters, for that academic session divided by the cumulative total credit units registered for the two semesters.  However, after the first year each semester will have its own successive cumulative total for the CGPA.
CGPA = Cumulative Grade Points earned/Cumulative Credits registered.

  • Advancement, Probation and Withdrawal:  A student is entitled for advancement to the next higher level if the CGPA is =1.00.  Probation ensued if the CGPA is <1.00 at the end of the first year or subsequent semester after the first year.  When the first academic session of a student ends and the CGPA of the student is  < 1.00 he/she will proceed to the next higher level on probation I.  Such a student must score a CGPA at 1.00 or more at the end of the first semester of his/her second academic session in order to eliminate the probation status.  If  at the end of the first semester of the second academic session, if the CGPA is still less than 1.00.  Such a student will be on probation II. At end of the second semester of the second academic session.  If the CGPA is still less than 1.00, he/she will be on probation III.  A student will be advised to withdraw from his/her programme after earningprobation III by a student who had earlier changed programme due to this phenomenon.
  • Award of Degrees: The class of the degree awarded shall be on the basis of final cumulative grade point average (CGPA) as follows: – First Class; CGPA  4.5 – 5 Second Class (Upper Division); 3.5, 4:4; Second Class (Lower Division): 2.4 3.49; Third Class; 1.5 2.49; Pass: 1.00 1.49; Fail; Less than one.  First Class, Second Class and minimum points for graduation Third Class degrees are classified as Honors Degrees.
  • Course Credit System:  The course credit system adopted in ADSU involves weighing courses according to credit units.  The number of credit units increases as the required contact hours increases.  For a semester with the normal fifteen (15) weeks of lecture, the weighing is given as:
  • Credit units = 15  lecture/tutorial hours or 45 hours of practical
  • Credit units = 15 x2 = 30 hours
  • Credit units = 15 x3 = 45 hours. This weighting is reflected in the calculation of examination and staff work load.
  • CURRICULUM STRUCTURE
    The chemistry curriculum is a series of sequential courses at four levels.
    The curriculum is build upon the following major branches of a Chemistry education.

  • Physical Chemistry
  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

Departmental Courses

100 Level

1st Semester

COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE UNIT SEMESTER STATUS
CHM 101 Introduction to Physical Chemistry 3 1 CR
CHM 111 Basic Practical Chemistry 1 1 CR
BIO101 General Biology I 2 1 CR
BIO 103 General Biology III 2 1 CR
PHY 107 Introduction to Heat, waves motion and sound 3 1 CR
PHY 117 Basic experimental Physics I 1 1 CR
CSC 101 Introduction to Computer Technology 2 1 CR
STA 101 Elements of Statistics 2 1 CR
MTH 103 Elementary Algebra and Sets 2 1 CR
GST 101 Communication in English I 2 1 CR
GST 103 Nigerian People and Culture 2 1 CR
TOTAL 22

2nd Semester

COURSE
CODE
COURSE TITLE UNIT SEMESTER STATUS
CHM 102 Introduction to Organic Chemistry 3 2 CR
CHM I04 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry 3 2 CR
CH 112 Basic Practical Chemistry II 1 2 CR
PHY 102 Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism 3 2 CR
PHY 104 Introduction to Optics and Modern Physics 3 2 CR
PHY 118 Basic Experimental Physics II 1 2 CR
CSC 102 Introduction to Digital Electronics 2 2 CR
MTH 104 Elements of Calculus 2 2 CR
GST 102 Use of Library, Study Skills, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) 2 2 CR
GST 104 or GST 106 Communication in French or Communication in Arabic 2 2 CR
TOTAL 22

200 Level

1st Semester

COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE UNIT SEMESTER STATUS
CHM 201 Physical Chemistry

3

1

CR

CHM 203 Inorganic Chemistry

3

1

CR

CHM 205 Organic Chemistry

3

1

CR

CHM 207 Petrochemistry

1

1

CR

CHM 211 Practical Inorganic Chemistry I

1

1

CR

PHY 205 Heat and Thermodynamics

3

1

CR

CSC 293 Application to Computer I

2

1

CR

MTH 207 Ordinary Differential Equations I

2

1

CR

GST 201 Communication in English I

2

1

CR

GST 203 Logic, Philosophy and Human Existence

2

1

CR

  TOTAL

23

 

 

2nd Semester

COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE UNIT SEMESTER STATUS
CHM 202 Nuclear Chemistry

2

2

CR

CHM 204 Analytical Chemistry

2

2

CR

CHM 212 Practical Organic Chemistry I

1

2

CR

CHM 214 Practical Physical Chemistry I

1

2

CR

BCH 204 Bio-Physical Chemistry

2

2

CR

PHY 206 Atomic Physics

3

2

CR

MTH 204 Linear Algebra I

2

2

CR

CSC 294 Application to Computer II

2

2

CR

BUS 206 Elements of Marketing

2

2

CR

GST 202 History and Philosophy of Science

2

2

GST 222 Peace and Conflict Resolution

2

2

CR

TOTAL

21

300 Level

1st Semester

COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE UNIT SEMESTER STATUS
CHM 301 Electrochemistry

3

1

CR

CHM 303 Chemical Kinetics

3

1

CR

CHM 305 Statistical Chemistry

2

1

CR

CHM 307 Inorganic Reaction Mechanism,

2

1

CR

CHM 309 Physical Organic Chemistry and Reaction Mechanism

2

1

CR

CHM 311 Organic Synthesis I

2

1

CR

CHM 313 Spectroscopy. Principles, application and |Instrumental methods of analysis

3

1

CR

CHM  315 Polymer Chemistry I

2

1

CR

CHM  317 Practical Organic Chemistry II

1

1

CR

CHM 319 Practical Inorganic and Physical Chemistry II

1

1

CR

GST   301 Entrepreneurship and Innovations

2

GST   305 Advanced Communication Skills

1

TOTAL

24

2nd Semester

CHM 388 Industrial Attachment (SIWES)

6

2

CR

TOTAL

6

400 Level

1st Semester

COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE UNIT SEMESTER STATUS
CHM 401  Advanced Thermodynamics

2

1

CR

CHM 403 Polymer Chemistry II

2

1

CR

CHM 405 Group Theory and Symmetry

2

1

CR

CHM 407 Organometallic Chemistry

2

1

CR

CHM 409 Natural Products Chemistry I

3

1

CR

CHM 411 Industrial Chemistry

3

1

CR

CHM 413 Alicyclic Chemistry, Stereochemistry and conformational Analysis

3

1

CR

CHM  415 Research Methods and Seminar

1

1

CR

GST 401 Business Creation and Growth

2

TOTAL

20

Optional Courses

CHM 417 Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

2

1

OP

CHM 419 Reaction in Non Aqueous Solvents

1

1

OP

CHM 421 Polymer Technology

2

1

OP

400 Level
2nd Semester

COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE UNIT SEMESTER STATUS
CHM 402 Quantum Chemistry

2

2

CR

CHM 404 Environmental Chemistry

2

2

CR

CHM 406 Chemical Crystallography and Solid State Chemistry

2

2

CR

CHM 408 Applied Colloids and Surface Chemistry

2

2

CR

CHM 410 Heterocyclic Chemistry

2

2

CR

CHM 412 Organic Synthesis II

2

2

CR

CHM 414 Industrial Chemistry II

3

2

CR

CHM  499 Research Project

4

2

CR

TOTAL

19

Optional Courses

CHM 416 Chemistry of the Rare Earth Elements

1

2

OP

CHM 418 Metals, Alloys and Phase Equilibria

2

2

OP

NOTE:   Students are required to register a minimum of 20 credit units

NB. 400 Level chemistry major students are advised to select 4 credit units from the optional courses as electives.  They should consult their Academic adviser in selecting these courses.

Course Description

Course Description

100-LEVEL COURSES:
CHM 101: Introduction to Physical Chemistry: (3units) CR
Equilibrium- Equilibrium state, mass action, equilibrium constant and calculations, charges in equilibrium, dissociation and calculations, PH, titration and indicators, buffer solutions, solubility products, hydrolysis. Thermodynamics – system and functions, first law, second law, free energy changes. Molar concentration and chemical equilibrium.
Electrochemistry – oxidation and reduction in terms of electron transfer, electrical conductivity, (metallic and electrolytic) Electrolysis; Faraday’s Laws, Galvanic cells, fuel cells, electrode potentials, Nernst’s equation, free energy and cell voltage.
Radioactivity – Stability of nucleus, half-life, natural and artificial radioactivity, radioactive particles; alpha, beta and gamma rays, application of radioactivity. Chemical Kinetics, definitions of concept, factors affecting rates reactions, collision theory, and energy diagrams.

CHM 102: Introduction to Organic Chemistry (3 units) CR
Historical survey of the development and importance of Organic Chemistry. Classes and Nomenclature of organic compounds (Saturated, unsaturated, straight chain, alicyclic and aromatic). Homologous series, functional groups, chemistry of groups and individual compounds. Electronic theory in organic chemistry. Stereochemistry. Isolation and purification of organic compounds. Quantitative organic chemistry. Determination of structure of organic compounds.

CHM 104 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry (3 units) CR
Atoms, Molecules and chemical reactions. Atomic structure and periodicity. Modern Electronic Theory- Orbitals, Bohr, Hund’s, Aufbau, Pauli Exclusion, Heisenberg Uncertainty Principles with models. Chemical equations and stoichiometry. Chemical bonding (with models).
Periodic table and periodicity of properties, Group Properties, Trends (Variation) of properties down the groups and along the periods. Hybridization and shapes of simple molecules and orbitals. Structure of solids (with models). Comparative study of groups 1-7 elements. Introduction to transition metals chemistry.

CHM III Basic Practical Chemistry (1 unit) CR
Selected experiments from CHM 101 and CHM 103.

CHM 112: Basic Practical Chemistry II (1 Unit) CR
Selected experiment from CHM 102 and CHM 104. (Inorganic and organic analysis for ions and functional groups)
200 – LEVEL COURSES
CHM 201: Physical Chemistry: (3 units) CR
Chemical thermodynamics. Description of thermodynamic systems: First law of thermodynamics and its application to ideal gases; therochemistry; Second law of thermodynamics and its applications. Entropy changes in reversible and irreversible processes. Third law of thermodynamics. Molecular Kinetics theory. Velocity of gas molecules. Kinetic energy of transition and temperature; Principle of equipartition of energy and relationship to heat capacities of gases. Predictions of molar heat capacities of gases. Distribution of molecular velocities; Root-mean-square velocity, average velocity and probable velocity. Frequency of collision mean free path. Elements of chemical kinetics, Rate constants of reactions, factors affecting reaction rates, Order and molecularity of reactions. Types of reactions; Half-life, Elements of electrochemistry, Faraday’s Laws and calculations, Standard electrode potentials and E.C.S series, Nernst’s equation (derivation and calculations). Rusting as electrolytic process.
Pre-requisite: CHM 101

CHM 202 Inorganic chemistry II (2 Units) CR
Introduction to Nuclear Chemistry; Composition of the atom, isotopes and isobars, nuclear binding energy, stability of the nucleus, properties of α-, β-, and γ- rays, detection of radiations. Aston’s mass spectrograph, separation of isotopes. Radioactivity, radioactive disintegration, Group displacement law, half life period, average life period, Nuclear transformation and classification of nuclear reactions-Nuclear fission and fusion. Radioactive tracers and their applications, Trans Uranium elements, Applications of radioactivity. Principles and measurement radioactivity, Radiation hazards.
Pre-requisite: CHM 101, CHM 103

CHM 203: Inorganic Chemistry (3 units) CR
General properties of P. block elements; Occurrence and extraction of elements in general; group properties. Compounds of B, Al, Ga (Oxides, Halides, Hydrides). Structures and properties of boranes, alumina. General properties and periodic trends of carbon, Si, Ge, Sn and Pb – Sterochemistry and bonding in their compounds. Important elements of groups V, VI, and VII and their compounds – Oxides and carbonates; group properties. General properties and importance of transition elements; metallic properties, coloured ions, variable valencies, formation of complex ions, nomenclature of complexes and uses of complex compound. Differences between firstand last two transition series. General properties and extraction of Cu, Ag and Au.

CHM 204 Analytical Chemistry (2 units) CR
Theory of errors; statistical treatment of data; Theory of sampling. Chemical methods of analysis including volumetric, gravimetric and physiochemical methods. Optical methods of analysis. Separation methods, thin layer, paper and Gas Chromatography.

BCH 204: Biophysical Chemistry (2 Units) CR
Acids Bases and Buffers; interaction of an acid with base. Concept of pH. Henderson-Hasselbech equation. pH measurement. Meter an indicators. Effect of pH on biological systems. Dissociation of polyprotic and weak acids. Types of biological buffers and their capacity. pH dependent ionization of proteins. Osmotic pressure and Donan equilibrium.

CHM 205: Organic Chemistry (3 Units) CR
Introduction to the determination of structure and physical methods in organic chemistry. Introduction to theoretical concepts. Detailed consideration of the reaction pathways of functional groups. Selected synthesis methods. Introduction to alicylic chemistry. Stereochemistry of organic compounds. Chemistry of compounds containing two or more functional groups. Carbohydrate Chemistry. Amino acids, peptides and proteins. Chemistry of heterocyclic compounds (furan, thiophene and pyridine). Fused ring system: Naphthelene, anthracene and phenanthrene.
Pre-requisites: CHM 102

CHM 207: Petrochemistry: (1 Unit). CR
Petroleum in the cotemporary energy scene. Nature, classification of crude petroleum and natural gases. Distribution of petroleum and natural resources (the global and Nigerian situations) petroleum technology, survey of refinery products and process. Petrochemicals in industrial raw materials prospects for the petrochemical industry in Nigeria.

CHM 211: Practical Inorganic Chemistry I (1 Unit) CR
Selected from CHM 103

CHM 212 Practical Organic Chemistry I (1 Unit) CR
Selected from CHM 205

CHM 214 Practical Physical Chemistry I (1 Unit) CR
Selected from CHM 201

300 LEVEL COURSES
CHM 301: Electrochemistry: (3 units) CR
Standard electrode potentials (more detailed consideration). Reversible and irreversible electrode processes. Types of galvanic cells including concentration cells. Liquid junction potential. Measurement of emf and its application. Nernst equation and its application to various cell systems (metal/metal, metal/gas, gas/gas, ion/ion).
Types of conductors. Theories of electrolytic dissociation and ionic interaction. Electrolytic conductance. Theories of electrolytic dissociations and ionic interaction. Debye-Huckel theory. Mechanism of electrical conduction in metals and electrolytes. Electrocapillary phenomenon, Polarisation. Sources and stores of electrical energy.
Pre-requisite: CHM 201:

CHM 303: Chemical kinetics: (3 Units) CR
Rate expression and order and molecularity of reactions (more detailed consideration), Unimolecular, bimolecular and tetramolecular reactions. First, second and third order reactions. Methods of determination of reactions order. Effect of temperature on reaction rates (with calculations). Arrhenius equation and activation energy concept.
Collision theory. Transition state and its thermodynamic interpretations. Reactions in solution. Effect of ionic strength on reaction rates.
Pre-requisite: CHM 201

CHM 305: Statistical Chemistry: (2 units) CR
Stastical distribution, Gibbs distribution. The Maxwell – Bolzman distribution. Entropy and probability. The partition functions. Evaluation of the partition function (to include transitional, rotational, vibrational, electronic and nuclear partition functions). The Fermi – Dirac and Bose – Einstein statistics.
Pre-requisite: CHM 101:

CHM 307: Inorganic Reaction Mechanism: (2 Units) CR
Review of the atomic and molecular orbitals, hybridization, and geometry of some common hybrids. Different types of reaction mechanisms, complex formation, theory of the coordinate bond, substitution reaction of square planar complexes, oxidation reduction reactions, and electron transfer reactions, reactions of organometallics, photochemical reactions.

CHM 309: Physical Organic Chemistry and Organic Reaction Mechanism: (2 Units) CR
Brief description of organic reaction mechanisms (to include structure, reactivity, energetics, kinetics and investigation of mechanisms). Nucleophilic aliphatic substitutions, additions and elimination reactions; aromatic substitution reaction-elimination Vs substitution. Brief treatment of rearrangement reactions. Pericyclic reactions. Woodward – Hoffman rules.
Pre-requisite: CHM 204
CHM 311: Organic Synthesis I (2 Units) CR
Simple functional group transformations of aliphatic and aromatic compounds; extending and shortening a carbon chain and application of named reactions in organic synthesis, protecting group concept, oxidation and reductions. Synthetic use of carbon rearrangement reactions. Synthesis of stereoisomers. Synthesis reagents.
Pre-requisite: CHM 205

CHM 313: Spectroscopy, Principles, Application and Instrumental Methods Analysis (3 Units) CR
Introduction to theory of various methods and applications, Quantum theory of rotation and vibration of visible, ultraviolet and infrared, Reman’s spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, X-ray spectrometry. Flame photometry, fluorescence NMR and phosphorescence spectrometry. Mossbouer effect, nuclear Quadruple resonance. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry, Gas Chromatograph mass spectrometry. Arch and spark spectrography and electron spin resonance and simple stastical calculations. Refractometry, luterferometry, polarimetry, polarography and calorimetry.
Pre-requisite: CHM 203 & CHM 204:

CHM 315: Polymer Chemistry I (2 Units) CR
The nature of polymer nomenclature. Outline of sources of raw materials for polymers; Polymerization process, condensation and addition. Solubility and solution properties of polymers; structure and properties of polymers. Fiber forming polymers.

CHM 317: Practical Organic II (1 Unit) CR
Selected experiments from CHM 309 and CHM 311.

CHM 319: Practical Inorganic II (1 Unit) CR
Selected experiments from CHM 307 and CHM 313.

CHM 321: Practical Physical II (1 Unit) CR
Selected experiments from CHM 301, and CHM 303.

CHM 401: Advanced Thermodynamics (2 units) CR
The free energy and work function. Standard entropy; The Gibb’s Helmholts equation; criteria for equilibrium. Thermodynamics calculations; Standard free energies; Quantitative relation of free energy change; the equilibrium constant; Partial molar properties; The chemical potential; Thermodynamics of solutions.
Pre-requisite: CHM 201.

CHM 402: Quantum Chemistry (2 unit) CR
Postulates of quantum mechanics, Uncertainty principle; The wave function; The Schrodinger equation; The Bohr atom; Hamiltonian; Laplace and Hermiltian Operators, Angular momentum; Solution of the Schrodinger equation; Eigen values and Eigen function; perturbation and variation methods.
Pre-requisite: CHM 201 & CHM 305.

CHM 403: Polymer Chemistry II (2 units) CR
Polymerization reaction and methods of commercial production; structure, properties and application of polyethylene, vinyl polymers, polymers, rubbers, polystyrenes, epoxy polymers, resins, polyamides, amino plastics, polyurethanes, flexible foams, elastomers; some natural high polymers cellulose, glycogen, starch, dextrin, pectin and polypeptides. Stero-polymers, mechanisms of polymerization.
Pre-requisite: CHM 315.

CHM 404: Environmental Chemistry: (2 units) CR
Concepts of elementary cycles. Characteristics of the atmosphere. Sources, types and effects of environmental pollution. Wate water treatment. Composition of domestic wastes. Water chemistry and analysis. Chemical and physical instrumentation in environment sciences.
Pre-requisite: CHM 208.

CHM 405: Group Theory and Symmetry (2 unit) CR
Some ideas of matrices and vectors. Definitions and theory. Properties and examples of groups, subgroups and classes. Representation of groups, character table and their application of chemical bonding and point groups. Group multiplications table, symmetry groups, molecular symmetry, classification of symmetries, symmetry operators and symmetries in Co-ordination compounds (Co-ordination number 2-8).
Pre-requisite: CHM 201 and CHM 203.

CHM 406: Chemical Crystallography and Solid State Chemistry (2 units) CR
Solid state, types of crystalline solid, crystals, symmetry elements, unit cell, Bravai’s lattices, point groups and space group. Bragg’s law of diffraction, X-ray generation and its detection, recording of X-ray diffraction patterns of power and single crystallizing Debye-schener, Laue Weissenbeng and precision cameras, powder and single crystal diffractometry. Type of 3 dimensional structures; Layer structure, chain structure ionic and covalent structures; ionic and covalent radii, coordinate ratio and number, close packing of crystalline solid, crystals structures determination.
Pre-requisite: CHM 201, CHM 305

CHM 407: Organometallic Chemistry (2 units) OP
Introduction to organometallic compounds of the transition elements; classification of ligands; Classical coordination and organometallic compounds; Sixteen and eighteen electron rules type of compounds; Synthesis, reactivity and structure of some organometallic compounds of non-transition and transition metals. Mechanisms of reaction and catalytic activities. The organic chemistry of ferrocene and related compounds.
Pre-requisite: CHM 203, and CHM 307.

CHM 408: Applied Colloids and Surface Chemistry (2 unit) CR
Position of the rare earth element in the periodic table, electronic configuration and consequences theory, metallurgy, isolation and oxidation states. Compounds including oxo-compounds, halates, perhalates, carbides, silicides and borides. The solution chemistry of actinides.
Pre-requisite: CHM 203 and CHM 307

CHM 409: Natural Products Chemistry (3 units) CR
Chemistry of terpenoids, steroids, and alkaloids, antibiotics, flavonoids, prostagladis and chlorophyll. Other neutral products of pharmaceutical importance. General methods of isolation, preparation, purification and structural determination of the neutral products. Classification . discuss of chemistry of important membrances Biogenesis.
Pre-requisite (s): CHM 205

CHM 410: Heterocyclic Chemistry: (2 units) CR
The synthetic and mechanistic aspects of fused heterocyclic system. Quinolines, isoinolines, benzofurans, Benzothiaphenes, Indoles, Benzopyrylium salt, coumarious and hoemones. Applications of heterocyclic system in drug synthesis.
Pre-requisite(s): CHM 205 and CHM 311

CHM 411: Industrial Chemistry/Technology. (3 units) OP
General discussion about the industrial importance of inorganic chemistry with stress over glass industry, steel industry, fertilizers and their importance. The relationships between chemistry, technology and economics in the chemical industry, primary raw materials for manufacture of organic chemical: (a) Fats and oil, (b) Carbohydrates, (c) Petroleum refining processes; origin of the petrochemical industry; the basic building blocks used in the organic chemical industry-ethylene, propylene, C4 hydrocarbons and aromatic hydrocarbons. Surface preparation and treatments.
Corrosion problems in industry, corrosion prevention, electroplating, electrosynthesis. Heat transfer and mass transfer. Unit operations. Chemical technology equipment.
Pre-requisite: CHM 203 & CHM 205

CHM 412: Organic Synthesis and Reaction Mechanism II (2 units) CR
More detailed consideration of the methods and mechanisms discussed in 300-level. Current synthetic procedures; current view(s) on some reaction pathways.
Pre-requisite(s): CHM 309 and CHM 311

CHM 413: Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (2 units) CR
Complex oxy and hydroxyl halides; Interhalogen compounds. Complex oxides, hydroxides, hydrates, carbides, nitrides and carbonyls. Non-Stoichiometric compounds, organic derivatives of phosphours synthesis, structure, stereochemistry, thermodynamic, reactivity bonding and application.
Pre-requisite: CHM 203, and CHM 307.

CHM 414: Industrial Chemical Processes/Technology II (3 units) CR
Hydrogen and carbon monoxide synthesis, gas, oxoprocess, water gas, source of hydrogen and its application. Industrial organic materials. Technical and economic principles of processes and product routes. Flow diagrams. Selected oils and fats, soaps and detergents, sugar, paint, varnishes, plastics, woodpulp and paper. Environmental pollution. Chemical processing of minerals. Metallurgy and hydrometallurgical processes. Industrial electrochemistry. Manufacture of some heavy inorganic chemicals. Cement and binding materials. Inorganic fertilizer.
Pre-requisite: CHM 411

CHM 415: Reactions in Non-Aqueous Solvent. (1 unit) OP
Solvents and solvent behaviours. Function of non-aqueous solvents; indifferent solvents water like solvents and physical properties of solvent. Reactions in liquid ammonia Hydrogen fluoride, Hydrogen sulphides N2O4, sulphur (iv) oxide, ethanoic acid, etc. radiolysis.
Pre-requisite: CHM 203, CHM 205, CHM 303 and CHM 307

CHM 416: Chemistry of Rare Earth Elements: (1 unit) OP
Position of the rare earth element in the periodic table, electronic configuration and consequences theory; metallurgy, isolation and oxidation states. Compounds including oxo-compounds, halates, perhalates, carbides, silicides and borides. The solution chemistry of anthinides.
Pre-requisite: CHM 203

CHM 417: Polymer Technology (2 units) OP
Large scale industrial polymerization processes. Polymer tech. polymer processing, injection, extrusion, compression and transfer moulding of thermoplastics. Polymer additives. Polymeric surface coatings and adhesives.

CHM 419: Alycyclic Chemistry, Stereochemistry and Conformational Analysis: (3 units) OP
Synthesis, properties and reactions of small, medium and large ring alicyclic compounds, ring strain and reactivity, bridged ring compounds; macrocyclic and catonances, structural isomers and stereoisomers, definitions and nomenclature, barrier to interconversion of stereoisomers; Racemic forms, Racemization correlation by chemical and physical methods. Molecular dissymethyl, allenes, spiro compounds and diphenyls; Conformation of cyclic molecules; basic principles of conformational analysis (cyclohexanes) physical methods in conformational analysis.
Pre-requisite: CHM 205 & CHM 206.

CHM 499: Research Project: (4 units) CR
Experience Investigation of a chemical research problem over 1-2 semesters.

Staff List

Academic Staff

S/NO

NAME

QUALIFICATION

RANK

FIELD OF SPECIALIZATION

NATURE   OF APPOINTMENT

1

Prof. J. T. Barminas Ph.D Professor Physical/Industrial Chemistry Academic

2

Dr. Alfred I. Onen Ph.D Senior  Lect. Physical/Material Chemistry Academic

3

Dr. Solomon A. Mamuru Ph.D Lect. I Textile Science & Tech. Academic

4

Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa Ph.D Lect. I Biochemistry Academic

5

Dr. E.T. Williams Ph.D Lect. I Organic Chemistry Academic

6

Dr. Idris A. Atadashi  Ph.D Lect. I Chemical Engineering Academic

7

Dr. Priscilla Alexander  Ph.D Lect. I Analytical Chemistry Academic

8

Shinggu D. Yamta M.Sc.    Ph.D in-view Lect. I Analytical Chemistry Academic

9

Sunday Peter Zira M.Tech  Ph.D in-view Lect. I Analytical Chemistry Academic

10

Hamidu Abubakar M.Tech,  Ph.D in-view Lect. II Industrial Chemistry Academic

11

Muluh Khan Emannuel M.Sc. Lect. II Organic Chemistry Academic

12

Ibrahim Toma M.Sc. Asst. Lect. Biochemistry Academic

13

Samuel T. Magili M. Tech.   Ph.D in view Asst. Lect. Analytical Chemistry Academic

14

Sudi Ismaila Yada M.Tech,    Ph.D in view Asst. Lect. Biochemistry Academic

15

Abdulhamid Umar M.Sc .      Ph.D in view Asst. Lect. Organic Chemistry Academic

16

Musa Yakubu M.Sc.  in-view Graduate Asst. Physical Chemistry Academic

Non-Academic Staff

NAME RANK QUALIFICATION AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Beatrice L. Penuel (Mrs.) Asst. Chief Techn. ND, HND Lab Tech
Iliya Kaigama Technologist III ND, HND Lab Tech
Saminu Abdulmalik Asst. Technologist ND Lab Tech
Kingi Isa (Mrs) Lab Attendant SSCE Lab

Registry Staff

NAME RANK QUALIFICATION AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Siye Daniel (Miss) Con Sec. III ND Secretary
Agnes J. Midala (Mrs) Snr Office Asst. ND Clerical Asst.